DB CooperFeatured case
CompositeAge progressed to unknown age
Sex Male
Race White
Location Vancouver, Washington
Active November 24, 1971
Unidentified for 48 years
Age approximation 40 - 49
Height approximation 5'10 - 6'
Weight approximation 170 - 180 pounds
Offense Hijacking, robbery

"Dan Cooper" is the alias used by an unidentified man who hijacked a Boeing 727 airplane on November 24, 1971. He parachuted out of the aircraft and was never seen again. Due to an error in communication, he is known commonly as "D.B. Cooper".

Characteristics

  • Brown eyes.
  • Dark complexion.
  • He smoked and drank.
  • He appeared to have the ability to fly an aircraft.

Clothing and accessories

  • A black raincoat.
  • Black suit.
  • White shirt.
  • Slip-on shoes.
  • Black clip-on tie with an abalone clip.
  • Black attaché case.
  • Dark sunglasses.

Case

Following the aircraft's departure from Portland, Oregon, "Cooper" wrote a note to a flight attendant and later informed her he was armed with a bomb in his suitcase. Following his instructions, the attendant informed the pilot of his demands for $200,000, parachutes, and a fuel-transporting vehicle's placement at the Seattle stop.

After the stop, he took steps to prevent his apprehension, as authorities had been notified. Most of the passengers departed and the plane resumed flight. Cooper is believed to have departed the aircraft mid-air between 8:13 and 10:15 that night. He left behind his tie, tie clip and two parachutes.

It is believed he was in financial need at the time of the crime. He may have been familiar with the geographical location, based on his own statements.

Investigation

Fingerprints were recovered from the plane, witnesses were interviewed, and composites were created. Police compiled an exhaustive list of potential suspects, who were never confirmed as the perpetrator.

Bodies of water were searched, as it was theorized he may have perished while attempting to land. Their efforts were fruitless until 1980, when a child discovered bundles of money on the shore of the Columbia River. The bills were confirmed to be those he obtained. The rest of the currency was never recovered.

Forensic tests were performed on the tie, which yielded the possibility he worked in a manufacturing company using metals or chemistry-related field. Spores from a species of moss were also observed, which may have originated from a "pharmaceutical product."

In 2016, the FBI announced they would postpone further investigation, despite requesting additional tips and evidence. A year later, volunteers located a fragment from a backpack and a parachute cord, which may have been related to the case.

Media appearances

Sources

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